Digital Imaging

Digital Imaging Class Description

Students use digital cameras, scanners, imaging software, printers and computers to explore the artistic potential of new imaging technology and solve visual problems. Students will learn how to plan and produce digital images that demonstrate an understanding of composition, light, color, visual impact and art history. Hands-on projects include digital painting, digital photography, image capture, image manipulation and graphic design problems.

Deciding on a Camera

The first thing to consider is what is the largest size print you would like to make from the pictures you take. Look at the information on megapixels below to get a sense of the relation between megapixels and print size. Once you have made that decision another thing to consider is the interface the camera uses. Is it user friendly? Is it easy to change settings, delete pictures or download images? Digital cameras store images on memory cards. Flashmemory, smartmedia or memory stick are types of digital film. Keep in mind the image storing options that a camera offers and compare the costs. The other things to look at in a digital camera are things you would consider with a film camera like lense, zoom and the feel of the camera.

Megapixels - The higher the pixel resolution of your camera the larger size quality print you will get. Listed below is information about 1, 2 and 3 megapixel cameras and the best size print you will be able to get from an image. Keep in mind that most digital cameras allow you to change the resolution of the pictures you are taking. So you could have a 3.1 megapixel camera that is set to take low resolution images that will yield poor quality prints.

  • A 1.3 megapixel image is 1280 pixels x 960 pixels. This is approximately 18 inches by 13 inches with a resolution of 72 pixels per inch. If you keep the pixels constant and change the dimensions to 7 inches by 5 inches the image will have a resolution of 182 pixels per inch. This resolution yields a decent inkjet or laser print.
  • A 2.2 megapixel image is 1901 pixels x 1212 pixels. This is approximately 26 inches by 17 inches with a resolution of 72 pixels per inch. If you keep the pixels constant and change the dimensions to 10 inches by 8 inches the image will have a resolution of 190 pixels per inch. This resolution yields a decent inkjet or laser print.
  • A 3.1 megapixel image is 2160 pixels x 1440 pixels. This is approximately 30 inches by 20 inches with a resolution of 72 pixels per inch. If you keep the pixels constant and change the dimensions to 12 inches by 8 inches the image will have a resolution of 180 pixels per inch. This resolution yields a decent inkjet or laser print.

Transferring Images from Camera to Computer

Most digital cameras come with cables and software that enables you to transfer your images from the camera to computer. In most cases using this method of transferring images is time consuming and limiting since you can only transfer images to computers that have the software installed. The simplest, fastest and easiest way to transfer images is to use a card reader. This device looks like a mouse and plugs in to the USB port of a Mac or PC.

 

Manipulating Images

The premier image editing software is Adobe's Photoshop. In the Spring of 2001 Adobe introduced Photoshop Elements. Elements is a light version of Photoshop that is incredibly powerful and reasonably priced.


Links

Digital Imaging - My course page at Eisenhower Middle School, Wyckoff, NJ

Grid Project - Reproductions of well known works of art are shown to a class. The students look at and discuss the works of art. Following the discussion students select an art work to copy. The reproduction is cut into squares and each student selects a predetermined number of squares to copy, the number of squares each student copies depends on class size and how the image is divided. The Hopper and Hokusai, show below, were divided into twenty-four squares. Students were introduced to computer painting tools and told to reproduce each square as a six inch square file. The students' completed squares are printed, cut out and glued to a backing.

Straight Photography - A brief introduction to straight photography including, subject, composition, light and shadow, landscape, portrait and still life.

Manipulated Photography - A list of imaging projects with examples of student work.

CD Insert Cover Project

CD Insert Back Cover Project

Class Links - This page will contain links to photography sites of interest to middle school students.

Digital Imaging at Benjamin Franklin Middle School - In the 2000 - 2001 school year I taught digital imaging to eighth-graders at this school.

Examples of Eighth-Grade Student Work

CD Project Examples

Additional Links

SanDisk- SanDisk is the world's leading supplier of flash data storage products in consumer. SanDisk's product line includes CompactFlash™ , MultiMediaCard, SmartMedia™ , Secure Digital (SD) Card, PC Card, PC Card Adapter, FlashDrive, ImageMate™ and SecureMate™ card readers and coming soon Memory Stick®.

Kodak - I use Kodak digital cameras with my students. The Kodak camera interface is easy for students to understand.

Adobe - Find out more about Photoshop Elements. You can also download a trial version of the program. Tutorials and FAQs are also posted on the site.

 



All work on this site ©Harold Olejarz 1997 - 2001 and the artists credited. No images or text may be used for commercial purposes without written permission from Harold Olejarz. Personal or educational uses are allowed with permission from Harold Olejarz.